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2 edition of 1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft found in the catalog.

1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft

1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft

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Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Technical Information Service, distributor in [Washington, DC], [Springfield, Va .
Written in


Edition Notes

StatementRichard S. Stolarski ... [et al.]
SeriesNASA reference publication -- 1381
ContributionsStolarski, Richard S, United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 v
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14993440M

Reviewer, NASA Assessment of the Effects of High-Speed Aircraft in the Stratosphere: , NASA/TP Panel Member, NASA New Investigator Program (summary reviewer for 5 proposal, secondary reviewer for an additional 10 proposals) Reviewer of book proposal, Environmental Sciences Case Study, 1/e, Addison Wesley. NASA Group Achievement Award – (March ) for the outstanding accomplishments of and contributions to the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment / Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft conducted in Christchurch, New Zealand. The SPADE mission tested a number of the concepts that underlie the stratospheric models used for assessment of high-speed civil transport (HSCT) effects on the stratosphere. In some cases these concepts appear to be sound, some appear doubtful (i.e., further analysis required to determine the significance of observed discrepancies), and some.


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1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft Download PDF EPUB FB2

Based on an experiment by Stolarski et al. [] simulating ozone destruction from a stratospheric fleet of high speed civil transport aircraft and extrapolating from a linear fit to their. Get this from a library. scientific 1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft book of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft.

[Richard S Stolarski; United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration.;]. The NRC Panel on the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation (PAEAN) was established to provide guidance to NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Program (AEAP) by evaluating the appropriateness of the program's research plan, appraising the project-sponsored results relative to the current state of scientific knowledge, identifying key scientific uncertainties, and suggesting research activities Author: National Research Council, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Environment and Resources Commission on Geosciences.

The results of NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) project were summarized in a NASA assessment. The present report looks at that summary and at more recent work to evaluate the state of the science.

AESA has made good progress in the past few years. The results of NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (AESA) project were summarized in a NASA assessment.

The present report looks at that summary and at more recent work to 1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft book the state of the science. This report provides a scientific assessment of our knowledge concerning the impact of proposed high-speed civil transport (HSCT) aircraft on the atmosphere.

It comes at the end of Phase 1 of the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft element of the NASA High-Speed Research Program. The advent of high-speed civil transport aircraft (HSCT's) some 25 years ago generated considerable concern about potential impacts on the stratosphere.

With. The NRC Panel on the Atmospheric Effects of Aviation (PAEAN) was established to provide guidance to NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Program (AEAP) by evaluating the appropriateness of the program's research plan, appraising the project-sponsored results relative to the current state of scientific knowledge.

This assessment was intended to examine, from the standpoint of present scientific understanding, the potential atmospheric impacts of a fleet of high-speed civil transports flying supersonically in the lower stratosphere. The program was initiated inand the bulk of its research is scheduled to be completed in SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND In view of the rapidly growing commercial air traffic, the investigation of possible chemical and climatic effects of aviation on the atmosphere received a renewed interest in this decade and led to several international research programs [e.g., Schumann, Stolarski and Wesoky, ; World Meteorological Organization (WMO), ].Cited by: 6.

Subsonic Assessment Program (SASS)--was formed with the goal of characterizing the effects that the current fleet of commercial aircraft have on atmospheric chemical and radiative processes, and what effect they may have in the coming years, as 1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft book traffic increases (Friedl ).

The scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft Technical Report Stolarski, R S ; Baughcum, S L ; Brune, W H ; This report provides a scientific assessment of present knowledge concerning the impact of proposed high-speed civil 1995 scientific assessment of the atmospheric effects of stratospheric aircraft book (HSCT) aircraft on the atmosphere.

Building on NASA's research in atmospheric science and emissions reduction, the AESA studies particularly emphasizing stratospheric ozone effects. Because it will not be possible to directly measure the impact of an HSCT aircraft fleet on the atmosphere, the only means of assessment will be prediction.

A recent AESA interim assessment report and a review of that report have shown that considerable uncertainty still exists about the possible impact of aircraft on the atmosphere. The AESA has been designed to develop the body of scientific knowledge necessary for the evaluation of the impact of stratospheric aircraft on the atmosphere.

Stratospheric Tracers of Atmospheric Transport (STRAT) Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft (ASHOE/MAESA) Stratospheric Photochemistry, Aerosols and Dynamics Expedition (SPADE) Second Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE-II).

A theory for the origin of this ozone layer was proposed in by a British scientist, Sydney Chapman, and is known as the Chapman mechanism. It lays the foundation for current understanding of stratospheric ozone.

Full text of "NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS) The Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft: a First Program Report" See other formats. The NASA High Speed Research Program (HSRP) is charged with assessing by the environmental impact of a projected fleet of high-speed civil transports (HSCT's, a commercial supersonic aircraft fleet).

The Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft Program (AESA) was established within the HSRP to prepare an assessment of the chemical perturbations to the atmosphere caused by. The NASA High Speed Research Program (HSRP) is charged with assessing by the environmental impact of a projected fleet of high-speed civil transports (HSCT's, a commercial supersonic aircraft fleet).

The Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft Program (AESA) was established within the HSRP to prepare an assessment. Impact of Aerospace Technology on Studies of the Earth's Atmosphere is a chapter book that describes the studies that use space-based instruments to explore many qualities of the atmosphere.

This text presents the studies about the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, climate, and pollution.

The NASA High Speed Research Program (HSRP) is charged with assessing by the environmental impact of a projected fleet of high-speed civil transports (HSCT's, a commercial supersonic aircraft fleet). The Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft Program (AESA) was established within the HSRP to prepare an assessment of the chemical perturbations to the atmosphere caused by HSCT emissions.

Aviation CO 2 emissions from the past until enlarged the atmospheric CO 2 concentration by ppmv (% of the anthropogenic CO 2 increase since ). Bythe global mean surface temperature had increased by about K, and the sea level had risen by Cited by:   The effect of the improved treatment of the diffuse flux is most pronounced in the lower stratosphere and in the troposphere.

Overall, the change in the calculated photolysis frequencies in the region of interest in the stratosphere is below about 20%, although larger deviations are found for H2O, O2, NO, N2O, and by:   Emissions may affect climate indirectly through chemical interactions in the atmosphere, but quantifications of such effects are difficult and uncertain due to incomplete knowledge and inadequate methods.

A preliminary assessment of the climatic impact of changes in tropospheric O3 and CH4 in response to various emissions is given. For a 10% increase in the CH4 emissions the relative Cited by: The documented flight conditions include a speed of Mach and a cruise profile centered at 20 km altitude.

The initial fuel consumption rate for this particular case is 44, kg/hr and the average consumption rate over the cruise portion of the flight is 37, kg/hr. The particular variables chosen for the parametric studies to evaluate the atmospheric effects of this type of aircraft are fuel burn, cruise altitude, and emission index of NOx.

From fuel burn, one can readily determine the emissions of water vapor (and carbon dioxide and several other types of emissions).Author: Mayurakshi Dutta, Kenneth O.

Patten, Donald J. Wuebbles. • Chair, National Research Council Panel on the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft,and principal author of the panel report Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft, National Academy Press, • Chair, National Research Council Committee on Grand Challenges in.

impact is clear. NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) addresses this need. A maj or component of the AEAP--the Subsonic Assessment Program (SASS)--was formed with the goal of characterizing the effects that the current fleet of commercial aircraft have on atmospheric.

Water vapor in the stratosphere originates from the troposphere by transport of water vapor itself and of methane and hydrogen, which degrade to make water ().Water, methane, and hydrogen are transported to the stratosphere through upwelling in tropical regions ().This upwelling followed by downwelling and horizontal transport in the extratropical stratosphere—the Brewer Cited by: Methyl bromide is the single largest contributor of stratospheric Br and an important contributor to stratospheric ozone depletion.

Soils have recently been identified as a significant sink of Author: Md Safiuddin. Jinyou Liang, in Chemical Modeling for Air Resources, Stratosphere. The stratosphere contains ~% of air mass over the Earth, and ranges from ~10 to ~50 km ASL with ascending temperature up to ~ K.

Due to precipitation in the troposphere, H 2 O can scarcely survive through vertical transport to reach the stratosphere. In the stratosphere, O 2 may be photolyzed by. Waugh Research Group Atmosphere & Ocean Dynamics and Transport.

Co-author of chapter 7 of WMO/UNEP “Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion”. Lead author of chapter 2 of NASA “Scientific Assessment of the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft”.

NASA, National Aeronautics and Space Administration () scientific assessment of the atmospheric effect of stratospheric aircraft.

NASA Reference PublicationWashington, District of Columbia, USA. Liquid and solid particles in the plumes of jet aircraft cruising in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere lead to the formation of ice clouds (contrails), modify the microphysical properties of existing cirrus clouds, and provide sites for heterogeneous chemical reactions.

Characterization of aviation-produced particles in terms of physico-chemical properties is an important Cited by: 1. Introduction. This report assesses the effects of aircraft on climate and atmospheric ozone and is the first IPCC report for a specific industrial subsector.

It was prepared by IPCC in collaboration with the Scientific Assessment Panel to the Montreal Protocol on. Recent Major Scientific Findings and Observations. The laboratory investigations, atmospheric observations, and theoretical and modeling studies of the past few years have provided a deeper understanding of the human-influenced and natural chemical changes in the atmosphere and their relation to the Earth's stratospheric ozone layer and radiative balance of the climate system.

Human activities have had a significant effect on the global concentration and distribution of stratospheric ozone since before the s.

In addition, scientists have noted that large annual decreases in average ozone concentrations began to occur by at least Measurements from satellites, aircraft, ground-based sensors, and other. An example of the early atmospheric measurements showing large ozone losses over Antarctica is shown in Fig.

These observations of ClO and O 3 were acquired in situ in the stratosphere by scientific instruments flying onboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft in September As the aircraft approached the chemically perturbed air over Antarctica, ClO concentrations rose dramatically, O 3.

An earlier assessment (NASA Reference Publication ) of potential effects of advanced supersonic aircraft on stratospheric ozone employed one-dimensional photochemical models to obtain estimates of globally averaged changes in ozone. The study reported here, an extension of the earlier work, was undertaken to estimate the lati.

Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: (). The Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft: A First Program Report; Reference Publication ; National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

(). Author, contributor, reviewer for various assessments pdf to stratospheric ozone and atmospheric effects of aircraft. Awards Fellow, American Geophysical Union () Fellow, American Meteorological Society () NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal .Increase in lower-stratospheric water vapour at a mid-latitude Northern Hemisphere site from to The IPCC Scientific Assessment Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft.NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Ebook Scientific Assessment of the Atmospheric Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft NASA Ref.

Publ. (). 3 Busen, R. & Schumann, U. Geophys.